ADRIENNE DEFENDI

Tuning Fork

qMeet the Artist

Paper Size:
Image Size:
Paper:
Frame:
Price:
Shipping:

40" x 40"
35" x 35"
Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Photo Rag Baryta
Roma Shadowbox Museum White
$2,645.00
Free to the Lower 48

Paper Size:
40" x 40"

Image Size:
35" x 35"

Paper:
Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Photo Rag Baryta

Frame:
Roma Shadowbox Museum White

Price:
$2,645.00

Shipping:
FREE

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Every purchase includes, at season's end, our beautiful large format Journal of all 52 photographs and the story of each, by the photographer.

DETAILS:

The image, Tuning Fork, was photographed with a low-tech, medium format camera called the Holga and 120 Kodak Portra film.  This low-tech camera has a plastic lens with two f-stops and four focus positions.  Introduced to the US by China in the early 1980s, each camera has its own idiosyncratic nature, but in general the Holga camera is known for its soft focus, edge vignetting, light leaks, and happy accidents.  There exists a very active Holga and plastic camera photographic community demonstrated by numerous annual shows, publications, and artists faithful to this artistic tool. I have photographed with Holga cameras for over fifteen years and house an extensive collection each with its own idiosyncratic qualities.  I photographed Tuning Fork with my very first Holga (SF 120), which is among my most treasured cameras. Shooting with a Holga helps me create the kind of photograph that mirrors my emotional register – the soft focus, the nostalgic and dreamy qualities, the layers of narrative in the play among clarity and obscurity. I have often photographed the same subject with both a Holga and twin-flex Rolleiflex, and whereas I might think both are effective aesthetically for different reasons, the Holga images resonate with me more deeply in an oneiric and even elegiac way. I also love the freedom and spontaneity the Holga offers me.  It falls lightly on the chest, bundles up easily in a bag, and I can easily shoot from the hip and with one hand.  But perhaps most significant, photographing with a Holga over the years has become a practice of letting go and being in the present as it unfolds.  Due to all the little mishaps that might occur with a Holga, I’m hopeful and inspired during the shoot but not attached to the images until I have the negatives and proofs in hand. Tuning Fork illustrates the union of my artistic vision and capturing the fading light after a day well spent in the woods.

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