Carsten Witte

The pulse of architecture

qMeet the Artist

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40" x 53"
40" x 53" BLEED
Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Photo Rag Baryta
Museum Shadowbox Black
$2,795.00
Free to the Lower 48

Paper Size:
40" x 53"

Image Size:
40" x 53" BLEED

Paper:
Hahnemühle 100% Cotton Photo Rag Baryta

Frame:
Museum Shadowbox Black

Price:
$2,795.00

Shipping:
FREE

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Every purchase includes, at season's end, our beautiful large format Journal of all 52 photographs and the story of each, by the photographer.

DETAILS:

Nothing stays as it is. “you look, where ever you look, you see vanity on earth” and ” Whatever one creates, another one will tear it down. Where cities grow today, wilderness will be tomorrow”  this once wrote Andreas Gryphius. Vanitas and Memento Mori are a constant theme in almost all genres of art. Also in Carsten Wittes work one will find the volatility of all earthly being as one of his main themes.”I am interested in the pure, the unadultered and its transience” Carsten Witte states. In the series “Deconstruction”  he is dealing with the aesthetic of built spaces. Picturesque, almost fragile, these iconic buildings seem to be. No matter if you look at his pictures of the Empire State Building, the Sydney Opera house or a modern church in Berlin, these static constructions develop a very unique dynamic, they become permeable and start fluctuating. With multi-exposures and little changes in perspective Witte thematises the fragility of human construction and anticipates weathering and destruction. The deconstructor deliberately brings a time component into play, the pulse, the motion and the speed of todays city life become visible in his images and change our view on our surroundings.Up to 20 shots Witte puts together, layer by layer, instead of brick by brick. This way his cityscapes transform into an architectonic distortion play, an association space for the spectator. “Everything is in constant change, it’s this what I want to symbolize in these works.”

Photography as the art of witnessing, Witte draws it back to these roots. 

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